books love back

make way for the heir of slytherin, seriously evil wizard coming through

Currently reading:
Fire and Hemlock
A Dance With Dragons
The Screwtape Letters
Cuckoo's Calling
American Gods

Happy 7th birthday, Deathly Hallows!

(Source: simplypotterheads, via castithann)

theparisreview:

T. S. Eliot’s illustrated letters. (via)

gameraboy:

Murder is snazzy!
Teen Comics #23 (1947)

gameraboy:

Murder is snazzy!

Teen Comics #23 (1947)

(via mudwerks)


Atonement (2007)
nprfreshair:

Francine Prose’s latest novel, called Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932, was inspired by this photograph and the strange back story of one of the women in it.  Book critic Maureen Corrigan has a review —- 

"Even the most restrained plot summary of Francine Prose’s latest novel sounds like a teaser for a late night Lifetime TV movie. Here goes: In the Paris of the late 1920s, a butch lesbian race car driver named Lou Villars has her license revoked by the French government for daring to dress as a man in public. Lou goes on to become a performer in a risque review at the Chameleon Club, a smoky nightclub where threadbare artists and thrill-seeking aristocrats mingle in the half-light. Hitler rises to power and, through an acquaintance on the old race car circuit, Lou is invited to be his special guest at the 1936 Olympics. There, she’s recruited as spy for Germany. In occupied Paris, she works as a Nazi collaborator and torturer. Late in the war, on a lonely road in the French countryside, Lou Villars receives her just deserts at the hands of the French Resistance.
Whew. That’s a whopper of a tale from a writer who’s known for championing a sophisticated literary style over the more pedestrian pleasures of storytelling.”

You can read the rest of Maureen’s review here. 

nprfreshair:

Francine Prose’s latest novel, called Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932, was inspired by this photograph and the strange back story of one of the women in it.  Book critic Maureen Corrigan has a review —- 

"Even the most restrained plot summary of Francine Prose’s latest novel sounds like a teaser for a late night Lifetime TV movie. Here goes: In the Paris of the late 1920s, a butch lesbian race car driver named Lou Villars has her license revoked by the French government for daring to dress as a man in public. Lou goes on to become a performer in a risque review at the Chameleon Club, a smoky nightclub where threadbare artists and thrill-seeking aristocrats mingle in the half-light. Hitler rises to power and, through an acquaintance on the old race car circuit, Lou is invited to be his special guest at the 1936 Olympics. There, she’s recruited as spy for Germany. In occupied Paris, she works as a Nazi collaborator and torturer. Late in the war, on a lonely road in the French countryside, Lou Villars receives her just deserts at the hands of the French Resistance.

Whew. That’s a whopper of a tale from a writer who’s known for championing a sophisticated literary style over the more pedestrian pleasures of storytelling.”

You can read the rest of Maureen’s review here

“The book circles me like a gnat. I circle it like a dog staked to a pole. Years it’s gone on that way.”

—   Mary Karr (via theparisreview)
nevver:

Back to work

“I did as when I could not sleep. I wandered in my mind, slowly, noting every detail of the labyrinth, its paths as familiar as those of my garden and yet ever new, as empty as the heart could wish or alive with strange encounters. And I heard the distant cymbals, There is still time, still time. But there was not, for I ceased, all vanished and I tried once more to turn my thoughts to the Molloy affair. Unfathomable mind, now beacon, now sea.”

—   Samuel Beckett, Molloy (via robcam-wfu)

(via thosewings)

nevver:

Peanuts
entregulistanybostan:

Samuel Beckett pendant une repetition de En attendant Godot, 1961
© Foto Roger Pico
© Département des Arts du Spectacle - Bibliothèque nationale de France
Source

entregulistanybostan:

Samuel Beckett pendant une repetition de En attendant Godot, 1961

© Foto Roger Pico
© Département des Arts du Spectacle - Bibliothèque nationale de France
calodaemon:

"The Sandman" by Salvador Dali.

calodaemon:

"The Sandman" by Salvador Dali.

(via vintagegal)

sesamestreet:

Earth Day!

heaven is for real

sesamestreet:

Earth Day!

heaven is for real