books love back

make way for the heir of slytherin, seriously evil wizard coming through

Currently reading:
Fire and Hemlock
A Dance With Dragons
The Screwtape Letters
Cuckoo's Calling
American Gods

hogwarts castle intaglio etch

[prints, stickers, etc!]

(Source: pumpkinbbatch, via mugglenet)

“The iPod, like the Walkman cassette player before it, allows us to listen to our music wherever we want. Previously, recording technology had unlinked music from the concert hall, the café, and the saloon, but now music can always be carried with us. Michael Bull, who has written frequently about the impact of the Walkman and the iPod, points out that we often use devices to ‘aestheticize urban space.’ We carry our own soundtrack with us wherever we go, and the world around us is overlaid with our music. Our whole life becomes a movie, and we can alter the score for it over and over again: one minute it’s a tragedy, and the next it’s an action film. Energetic, dreamy, or ominous and dark: everyone has their own private movie going on in their heads, and no two are the same….Theodor Adorno… called this situation ‘accompanied solitude,’ a situation where we might be alone, but we have the ability via music to create the illusion that we are not.”

—   from How Music Works, by David Byrne (via girlfromtralfamadore)

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

babywinterlove:

Where the Wild Things Are pumpkin carving

babywinterlove:

Where the Wild Things Are pumpkin carving

(via teachingliteracy)

retrogasm:

BOOK POWER!

retrogasm:

BOOK POWER!

nevver:

Peanuts
retrogasm:

Still…

retrogasm:

Still…

“I guess it’s true what they say: if you wait long enough everything changes.”

—   Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her (via bookmania)

lauriehalseanderson:

Hermione is the Empress of my Universe

(Source: stiles-stlinski, via yeahwriters)

“Tonight, once more, life sinks its teeth into my heart.”

—   Simone de Beauvoir, from a diary entry (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

jonklassen:

moon deer

jonklassen:

moon deer

entregulistanybostan:

Italo Calvino  en Versilia (costa toscana) en 1969
Sin data de autor - Fuente y más fotos
kulturtava:
Italo Calvino

entregulistanybostan:

Italo Calvino  en Versilia (costa toscana) en 1969

Sin data de autor - Fuente y más fotos

kulturtava:

Italo Calvino

nevver:

It’s over
Happy b’day to my boys F & B

konfusedfae said: I've read a lot of your books & have loved some more than others. American Gods fell somewhere in the middle. I read it at a bad time & do think that played a factor, but also just don't think it was meant to be my favorite. I get SO MUCH criticism for this opinion, most of it fairly condescending as it's such an intelligent book. I read everything from Lemony Snicket to Shakespeare, so I find this offensive. Do you have any thoughts on how to handle this without just telling these people off?

neil-gaiman:

You like what you like. Nobody can tell you to like something that you don’t, or not to like something you do — or if they do, it’s not going to change anything in your head, no more than they can be made to like or dislike garlic or lobster or chocolate or olives or natto by you telling them to change their minds.

I don’t expect everyone to love everything I write. I don’t think that if you like something I write you’ll like the next thing, any more than I love everything that the people whose work I enjoy do.

There are Dickens novels I think as good as anything anyone’s ever done, and Dickens books I will be very happy never to read again or think of again. I’m happy to know that my judgment is subjective, but then, that’s the whole point of having a point of view.

I published AMERICAN GODS after STARDUST, and most of the people who loved STARDUST did not love AMERICAN GODS, and the people who loved AMERICAN GODS and picked up STARDUST next were often very disappointed indeed. And I am proud of both of them, as I am of all my art-children…