books love back

make way for the heir of slytherin, seriously evil wizard coming through

Currently reading:
Fire and Hemlock
A Dance With Dragons
The Screwtape Letters
Cuckoo's Calling
American Gods

entregulistanybostan:

Italo Calvino  en Versilia (costa toscana) en 1969
Sin data de autor - Fuente y más fotos
kulturtava:
Italo Calvino

entregulistanybostan:

Italo Calvino  en Versilia (costa toscana) en 1969

Sin data de autor - Fuente y más fotos

kulturtava:

Italo Calvino

nevver:

It’s over
Happy b’day to my boys F & B

konfusedfae said: I've read a lot of your books & have loved some more than others. American Gods fell somewhere in the middle. I read it at a bad time & do think that played a factor, but also just don't think it was meant to be my favorite. I get SO MUCH criticism for this opinion, most of it fairly condescending as it's such an intelligent book. I read everything from Lemony Snicket to Shakespeare, so I find this offensive. Do you have any thoughts on how to handle this without just telling these people off?

neil-gaiman:

You like what you like. Nobody can tell you to like something that you don’t, or not to like something you do — or if they do, it’s not going to change anything in your head, no more than they can be made to like or dislike garlic or lobster or chocolate or olives or natto by you telling them to change their minds.

I don’t expect everyone to love everything I write. I don’t think that if you like something I write you’ll like the next thing, any more than I love everything that the people whose work I enjoy do.

There are Dickens novels I think as good as anything anyone’s ever done, and Dickens books I will be very happy never to read again or think of again. I’m happy to know that my judgment is subjective, but then, that’s the whole point of having a point of view.

I published AMERICAN GODS after STARDUST, and most of the people who loved STARDUST did not love AMERICAN GODS, and the people who loved AMERICAN GODS and picked up STARDUST next were often very disappointed indeed. And I am proud of both of them, as I am of all my art-children…

freshcleanfit:

In other news, this is one of my favorite Twitter happenings to date. 

freshcleanfit:

In other news, this is one of my favorite Twitter happenings to date. 

(via theliterarysnob)

theparisreview:

Congratulations to Ursula K. Le Guin for the National Book Foundation’s 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and Louise Erdrich for the PEN/Saul Bellow prize!
nitratediva:

It’s International Literacy Day. Make sure you teach a kid that reading is cool! From the trailer for Howard Hawks’s The Big Sleep (1946).

nitratediva:

It’s International Literacy Day. Make sure you teach a kid that reading is cool! From the trailer for Howard Hawks’s The Big Sleep (1946).

(via themoonraker)

neil-gaiman:

n0wens:

Rattle his bones

Over the stones

It’s only a pauper

Who nobody owns

Words taken from Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book - one of my absolute favourites. I had the poem inscribed on a set of four rings.

neil-gaiman

Wow.

“To many, I was myth incarnate, the embodiment of a most superb legend, a fairy tale. Some considered me a monster, a mutation. To my great misfortune, I was once mistaken for an angel. To my mother, I was everything. To my father, nothing at all. To my grandmother, I was a daily reminder of loves long lost. But I knew the truth—deep down, I always did.

I was just a girl.”

—   Leslye Walton, The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender
lifeonsundays:

Stay.

sosuperawesome:

Nokkasili, on Tumblr

(via applefrost)

nevver:

James Baldwin
nevver:

Buzz, buzz